Essays On Political Issues In India

Politics In India Essay

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES FACING DEMOCARCY?POLITICAL SCIENCE 1101 RESEARCH PAPERCOMPILED BYBALJIT SINGH300191011DOUGLAS COLLEGEThis paper was prepared for Political Science 1101, Section 050, taught by Professor Shaun Tyakoff

Democracy is defined as ' The Government of the people, for the people, and by

The people, but there are many challenges facing democracy in many countries

across the world. India is a perfect example of a nation that is 'fully democratic' even as it develops and faces several challenges. This paper is divided into two different parts showing the problems facing Indian Democracy. The first part briefly talks about the Inequality among peoples in India. Inequality is also divided into three main categories such as Geographic, Social and Demographic. The second part is an approach to identify the problem of corruption among political leaders and discussing the development of criminalization of politics.

One of the major issues facing Indian democracy today is Inequality among the citizens of India, weather it is Geographic Inequality, Social Inequality, or Demographic Inequality. First of all, Geographic inequality occurs when a government and citizens of different regions have unequal parliament representation. Geographic inequality is a big issue India is facing today because of its uneven density of representatives per population (D.Joshi, 2012,402). Geographic inequality also occurs when the party they are choosing does not represent voters in a district. In statistics it showed that, in 2009, India's 543 LS constituencies averaged 14.9 candidates, but only one representative was elected by each district (D.Joshi, 2012, 402). The statistics showed that it was only half of the voters in every constituency with no representation at district level.

Another big issue Indian democracy is facing is Demographic Inequality, this type of inequality occurs when the government of the nation fails to reflect the class, gender, age, ethnic, religious and ethnic makeup of its population. One of the things that D.Joshi points out (2012) is that elderly people in India are over - represented and young people are twice as under- represented in India. However, the greatest inequality a country could have is less female representatives. Increasing female representatives in India could help them reduce gender inequality. India is a nation where discrimination against women is widely spread across the country, whereas men are considered a source of income and prosperity. With lack of women education and power, the nation is facing a devastating challenge's towards its democracy. In some areas of India, women are not allowed to participate in any voting elections.

Moreover, the third type of Inequality that Indian democracy is facing is social...

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The politics in India is different from the politics in other government in the world. It is a federal parliamentary government. Federal system is wherein there is division of government powers but the national government still holds more power than the local government. A parliamentary government is where the legislative and executive are in one department, held by the ministers and led by the Prime Minister that was chosen by through a vote by the ministers. In this kind of government, there is still a president that is considered as a symbol of the State but the Prime Minister is the head of the state. In this kind of government, the Prime Minister does not have a specific term and may be voted out by the ministers. Their government is based on the dual polity system or the double government. This means there is central authority and its states surrounding the same.

The politics in India started late because India was in colonization by the Britain. When British forces chose to let go of India – that is when the democracy started within India. The constitution of India was enforced in 1950. It is the longest written constitution, but has been amended many times.

Basically, the government of India is composed of the lower house and upper house, with the federal system like the United States. The Upper house is called the Rajya Sabha that represents the states of the Indian Federation and the lower house, Lok Sabha, which represents the people of India as a whole. The lower house, as patterned from the British House of Commons.

 

At present, the President of India is Ram Nath Kovind. He is a Dalit, India’s lowest Castes that was picked by an electoral college to become president last July 2017 elections. He has gained the hearts of the people because he is a Supreme Court lawyer and was a governor of the Northern state of Bihar. Despite the fact that the election of the president is merely symbolic, his role is still essential to the politics of India.

On the other hand, the Prime Minister is the Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi. He is known for his strong combat against corruption in the government and its weak growth. Just as the trend of the governments right now who clamor of stronger and stern leadership in the highest position of government. He won through a landslide victory last May 2014 parliamentary elections. At his time, the government is single handedly won by a majority of one party only. PM Modi wanted to create a stronger economy in India. Apparently, there are issues that surround the election of PM Modi. He has sided with religious sentiment at times. The most controversial is the appointment of a Hindu prelate as chief of minister of Uttar Pradesh. Nonetheless, he has indeed kept his promise to keep the economy of India stronger. From 6.4% in 2013, the economy grew to 7.9% in 2015. India became the fastest growing economy in the world because of PM Modi.

PM Modi won the parliamentary elections because of his promised reformation. But with his leadership, he has showed to be a great administrator rather than a reformer. There were no extreme changes in India, instead, he has lead the government in smooth running compared to the former leaders. But there is a big chance for the government to arise better because of PM Modi. According to political analysts, PM Modi is playing it right and waiting for get the hearts of the majority in the upper house for him to impose bigger reforms.

PM Modi does not show any hint of his plans for India. He is very careful of his actions. Whatever his plans are, India has still nonetheless has achieved better when Modi won the parliamentary elections.

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